Notices

NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS OF THE WILLARD WATER DISTRICT

Dear Willard Water District Public Water Supply Customer,

The Willard Water District Public Water Supply recently violated a drinking water standard set by the New York State Department of Health.  Although this is not an emergency, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what the district is doing to address this situation.

The Willard Water District’s public water supply has levels of trihalomethanes above that specified by the New York State Department of Health.   The district is required to sample water for trihalomethanes within the district’s distribution system each quarter of the year, and then average the quarterly sample results obtained within the past twelve months.  This value is called the Running Annual Average.  The New York State Department of Health has set the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for the Running Annual Average of trihalomethanes at 80 parts per billion.  The Willard Water District’s public water system’s current Running Annual Average is 82.575 parts per billion or 2.575 parts per billion above the allowable concentration.  Water samples are collected at the far ends in the distribution system where the trihalomethane levels should be the highest and therefore may not be representative of the system as a whole.

We are required by the New York State Department of Health to advise you through this mailing of this situation and to provide you with additional information concerning trihalomethanes. Here are brief answers to some questions you might have:

What should I do?

You do not need to boil your water or take other corrective actions. No immediate action is required or necessary. If you wish to take further precautions, however, you can use bottled water or use individual household filters certified to remove trihalomethanes. You do not have to avoid using the water.

Is It Safe to Drink My Water?

It has yet to be determined whether drinking water above 80 parts per billion is a health danger. However, for more than three decades the Health Department’s drinking water standards were set at a much higher level of 100 parts per billion.

Who is affected?

Individuals receiving public water within the Willard Water District.

Where do trihalomethanes come from?

Trihalomethanes are a group of chemicals that includes chloroform, bromoform, bromodichloromethane, and chlorodibromomethane. Trihalomethanes are formed in drinking water during treatment by chlorine, which reacts with certain acids that are in naturally-occurring organic material (e.g., decomposing vegetation such as tree leaves, algae or other aquatic plants) in surface water sources such as rivers and lakes. The amount of trihalomethanes in drinking water can change from day to day, depending on the temperature, the amount of organic material in the water, the amount of chlorine added, and a variety of other factors. Drinking water is disinfected by public water suppliers to kill bacteria and viruses that could cause serious illnesses. Chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in New York State. For this reason, disinfection of drinking water by chlorination is beneficial to public health.

The Willard Water District’s public water is drawn from Seneca Lake.  The water is filtered and then disinfected with chlorine by the Willard Drug Treatment Center before it is delivered to the Willard Water District. 

What are the potential health effects?

Some studies suggest that people who drink chlorinated water (which contains trihalomethanes) or water containing elevated levels of trihalomethanes for long periods of time may have an increased risk for certain health effects. For example, some studies of people who drank chlorinated drinking water for 20 to 30 years show that long term exposure to disinfection by-products (including trihalomethanes) is associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancer. A few studies of women who drank water containing trihalomethanes during pregnancy show an association between exposure to elevated levels of trihalomethanes and small increased risks for low birth weights, miscarriages and birth defects. However, in each of the studies, how long and how frequently people actually drank the water, as well as how much trihalomethanes the water contained is not known for certain. Therefore, we do not know for sure if the observed increases in risk for cancer and other health effects are due to trihalomethanes or some other factor. The individual trihalomethanes chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane cause cancer in laboratory animals exposed to high levels over their lifetimes. Chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane are also known to cause effects in laboratory animals after high levels of exposure, primarily on the liver, kidney, nervous system and on their ability to bear healthy offspring. Chemicals that cause adverse health effects in laboratory animals after high levels of exposure may pose a risk for adverse health effects in humans exposed to lower levels over long periods of time.

What Is the Willard Water District Doing About It?

  1. The district is increasing the frequency of flushing their water mains. Research has shown that the potential for the formation of trihalomethanes is greatest the longer chlorine remains in contact with the organic matter in the water. Flushing reduces this “contact time” which reduces trihalomethane formation.

Consumers having questions on any of the above can contact the Town of Romulus at (607) 869-9326, or the Seneca County Health Department at (315) 539-1945.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments and businesses) by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Willard Water District

NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS OF THE RT 89 WATER DISTRICT

Dear Romulus Route 89 Water District Public Water Supply Customer,

The Romulus Route 89 Water District Public Water Supply recently violated a drinking water standard set by the New York State Department of Health.  Although this is not an emergency, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what the district is doing to address this situation.

The Romulus Route 89 Water District’s public water supply has levels of trihalomethanes above that specified by the New York State Department of Health.   The district is required to sample water for trihalomethanes within the district’s distribution system each quarter of the year, and then average the quarterly sample results obtained within the past twelve months.  This value is called the Running Annual Average.  The New York State Department of Health has set the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for the Running Annual Average of trihalomethanes at 80 parts per billion.  The Romulus Route 89 Water District’s public water system’s current Running Annual Average is 91.1425 parts per billion or 11.1425 parts per billion above the allowable concentration.  Water samples are collected at the far ends in the distribution system where the trihalomethane levels should be the highest and therefore may not be representative of the system as a whole.

We are required by the New York State Department of Health to advise you through this mailing of this situation and to provide you with additional information concerning trihalomethanes. Here are brief answers to some questions you might have:

What should I do?

You do not need to boil your water or take other corrective actions. No immediate action is required or necessary. If you wish to take further precautions, however, you can use bottled water or use individual household filters certified to remove trihalomethanes. You do not have to avoid using the water.

Is It Safe to Drink My Water?

It has yet to be determined whether drinking water above 80 parts per billion is a health danger. However, for more than three decades the Health Department’s drinking water standards were set at a much higher level of 100 parts per billion.

Who is affected?

Individuals receiving public water within the Romulus Route 89 Water District.

Where do trihalomethanes come from?

Trihalomethanes are a group of chemicals that includes chloroform, bromoform, bromodichloromethane, and chlorodibromomethane. Trihalomethanes are formed in drinking water during treatment by chlorine, which reacts with certain acids that are in naturally-occurring organic material (e.g., decomposing vegetation such as tree leaves, algae or other aquatic plants) in surface water sources such as rivers and lakes. The amount of trihalomethanes in drinking water can change from day to day, depending on the temperature, the amount of organic material in the water, the amount of chlorine added, and a variety of other factors. Drinking water is disinfected by public water suppliers to kill bacteria and viruses that could cause serious illnesses. Chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in New York State. For this reason, disinfection of drinking water by chlorination is beneficial to public health.

The Romulus Route 89 Water District’s public water is drawn from Cayuga Lake.  The water is filtered and then disinfected with chlorine by the Town of Seneca Falls Water District.  From Seneca Falls the water goes to the Fayette Water District #7 and then the Varick Water District #4 before it is delivered to the Romulus Route 89 Water District.

What are the potential health effects?

Some studies suggest that people who drink chlorinated water (which contains trihalomethanes) or water containing elevated levels of trihalomethanes for long periods of time may have an increased risk for certain health effects. For example, some studies of people who drank chlorinated drinking water for 20 to 30 years show that long term exposure to disinfection by-products (including trihalomethanes) is associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancer. A few studies of women who drank water containing trihalomethanes during pregnancy show an association between exposure to elevated levels of trihalomethanes and small increased risks for low birth weights, miscarriages and birth defects. However, in each of the studies, how long and how frequently people actually drank the water, as well as how much trihalomethanes the water contained is not known for certain. Therefore, we do not know for sure if the observed increases in risk for cancer and other health effects are due to trihalomethanes or some other factor. The individual trihalomethanes chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane cause cancer in laboratory animals exposed to high levels over their lifetimes. Chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane are also known to cause effects in laboratory animals after high levels of exposure, primarily on the liver, kidney, nervous system and on their ability to bear healthy offspring. Chemicals that cause adverse health effects in laboratory animals after high levels of exposure may pose a risk for adverse health effects in humans exposed to lower levels over long periods of time.

What Is the Romulus Route 89 Water District Doing About It?

  1. The district is increasing the frequency of flushing their water mains. Research has shown that the potential for the formation of trihalomethanes is greatest the longer chlorine remains in contact with the organic matter in the water. Flushing reduces this “contact time” which reduces trihalomethane formation.

Consumers having questions on any of the above can contact the Town of Romulus at (607) 869-9326, or the Seneca County Health Department at (315) 539-1945.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments and businesses) by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Romulus Route 89 Water District

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2021- Rt 89

2021 Drinking Water Quality Report

Town of Seneca Falls – 130 Ovid St. Seneca Falls, NY 13148

(Town of Seneca Falls Public Water System ID# NY49011)

Town of Romulus – Rt 89 Water District – Romulus Water Department – NY4914588

INTRODUCTION:

The Rt 89 Water District purchases water from the Town of Seneca Falls via the Varick Water District.

To comply with State regulations, the Town of Seneca Falls, will be annually issuing a

report describing the quality of your drinking water. The purpose of this report is to raise

your understanding of drinking water and awareness of the need to protect our drinking water sources. Last year, your tap water met all State drinking water health standards.  This report provides an overview of last year’s water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what is contains, and how it compares to State standards.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water, please contact James Varricchio, Chief Operator at 315-257-7104. We want you to be informed about your drinking water. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our Town Board meetings. The meetings are held on the first Tuesday of each month at 7:00P.M. in the Town Meeting Room located at 130 Ovid St, Seneca Falls, New York. If you have any questions concerning the water supply after it passes through our meter station, please contact Robert Stapleton at 607-869-9326 ext. 231. Also, you are welcomed and encouraged to attend our regular Town Board meetings on the third Wednesday of each month, 7:30 pm at the Romulus Town Hall. Or you may visit us on the World Wide Web at: www.romulustown.com 

WHERE DOES OUR WATER COME FROM?

In general, the sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of

animals or from human activities. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the EPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The State Health Department, and the FDA’s regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health. Our water source is surface water drawn from Cayuga Lake. During 2021, our system did not experience any restriction of our water source. The treatment plants water intake is located 1,850ft from the western shore of Cayuga Lake and is in 25 feet of water.

DESCRIPTION OF THE TREATMENT PROCESS:

Raw water is drawn into the treatment plant through a 30” diameter intake line. As the raw water enters the treatment plant, a coagulant is added to assist in the settling of particles that may be in the water prior to filtration. The coagulant currently being used is PAC (poly-aluminum chloride). This chemical causes the particles to attract to each other and become dense enough to settle by gravity. The treatment plant also has the ability to add activated carbon for taste and odor control. After settling takes place, the water enters one of the five filters located in the main building of the plant. The water passes through a layer of anthracite coal, GAC (granular activated carbon) and several layers of sand to remove any remaining particles larger than 0.3 NTU1. After filtration, the water enters a 450,000-gallon clear well tank that is located beneath the main filter building. This filtered water then passes through an ultra-violet light unit for disinfection. Gaseous chlorine is then added to the filtered/treated water to establish a free chlorine residual. This free chlorine residual prevents any bacteria growth in the distribution system. The now potable water is then pumped through a 20” diameter transmission main to the distribution system to supply the users and maintain the level of the storage towers.

Information regarding the Cayuga Lake watershed can be found on the Internet at www.cayugawatershed.org or by contacting the Genesee/ Finger Lakes Regional Planning Council, 1427 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618, 585-442-3770. This website is an excellent source of information regarding the characterization of the entire watershed.

FACTS AND FIGURES:

Our water system serves approximately 9,000 people with 4,450 service connections. The number includes residential as well as commercial and industrial users. The total potable

water produced in 2021 was 323,843,000 total gallons for an average daily production of 887,241 gallons per day. Our highest single day of production was 1,655,000 gallons, which occurred on 11/17/2021. The cost for the amount of water to a Town customer is $61.75/quarter. This amount covers 1,200 cubic feet or about 8,976 gallons of water; water usage exceeding 1,200 gallons is charged 0.0468 ¢ per cubic foot.

In the Town of Fayette, Cayuga Lake Water District #3, the Town supplied 13,830,955 gallons of water (1,849,058 cu Ft) to its customers during 2021 at a rate of $3.00/1,000 gallons. All customers of this district should contact the Town of Fayette @ 315-585-6282 regarding any billing and/or service questions. The Town of Seneca Falls billed and supplied Fayette Water District #7 customers for 4,888,539 gallons (653,548 cu Ft).

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN OUR DRINKING WATER?

As the State regulations require, we routinely test your drinking water for numerous contaminants. These contaminants include: total coliform, E. Coli, turbidity, alkalinity, total organic carbon, 21 inorganic compounds, nitrate, 25 volatile organic compounds, total trihalomethanes, and 52 synthetic organic compounds. The table included in this report depicts which compounds were detected in your drinking water. The State allows us to test for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old. Anyone interested in copies of the individual laboratory reports can contact the Chief Operator, James Varricchio at 315-257-7104.

It should be noted that all drinking water, including bottled drinking water, might be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the Seneca County Health Department at 315-539-1945.

ContaminantViolation Yes/ NoDate of SampleLevel Detected (Avg/Max) (Range)Unit MeasurementMCLGRegulatory Limit (MCL, TT or AL)Likely Source of Contamination
Turbidity1 (Distribution System)  NO  11/19/210.03 Ave 2.15 Max 0.03- 2.15 Range  NTU  N/A  TT=<5 NTU  Soil Runoff
  Turbidity1  NO  7/01/210.074 Ave 0.25 Max 0.03- 0.25 Range  NTU  N/A  1.0  Soil Runoff
  Total Coliform  YES  9/9/21- 9/13/21  2 samples  N/A  0  >5% of samplesNaturally present in the environment.  
  E. Coli  YES  9/9/21  1 sample  N/A  N/A1 or more positive samples3Human and animal fecal waste.
    Nitrate    NO    9/30/21    0.91    mg/L    10    10Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks; sewage, Erosion of natural deposits.
  BariumNO9/30/210.025mg/L22Naturally occurring.
AluminumNO9/26/210.87Mg/l   
    Sodium    NO    9/30/21    32    mg/L  (See health effects)    N/ANaturally occurring; Road salt; Water softeners; Animal waste
Total Trihalomethanes Disinfection By-Products   (TTHM’s- chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform)          NO          1 sample per quarter @ 2 sites  57 Ave 38-70 Range @ Site #1   48 Ave 27-67 Range @ Site #2          µg/L          80          N/ABy-products of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms. TTHM’s are formed when source water contains large amounts of organic matter.
    Total Trihalomethanes Disinfection By-Products Rt 89 Water District NY4914588            YES          1 sample per quarter @ 1 site        55.9-145 range   83.99- Running Annual Average          µg/L          80          N/ABy-products of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms. TTHM’s are formed when source water contains large amounts of organic matter.
    Haloacetic Acid Disinfected By-products        NO      1 sample per quarter @ 2 sites26 Ave 19- 34 Range @ Site #1   23 Ave 13-27 Range @ Site #2        µg/L        60        N/A    By-products of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms.
    Haloacetic Acid Disinfected By-products Rt 89 Water District NY4914588        NO    1 sample per quarter @ 1 site      19.8-37.3   27.025- Running Annual Average        µg/L        60        N/A  By-products of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms.
  Copper    NO    12/16/200.035- 90% 0.001- 0.36 (range)4    mg/L    1.3      AL = 1.3Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood.
  Lead    NO    12/15/200.0012- 90% ND-0.0024 (range)5    mg/L    0    AL= 0.015Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.
FluorideNO    9/30/210.11mg/LN/A2.23= MCLNaturally occurring
NickelNO9/30/210.0012mg/LN/AN/ADischarge from stainless steel factories.
Methylene chlorideNO9/30/21<0.50Ug/LN/AMCL= 5.0 
                Total Organic Carbon                    NO                    7/1/21                AVG 1.66 MAX 2.0   RANGE 1.3- 2.0                    mg/L                    N/A                    TTTotal organic carbon (TOC) has no health effects. However, total organic carbon provides a medium for the formation of disinfection byproducts. These byproducts include trihalomethanes (THM’s) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Drinking water containing these byproducts in excess of the MCL may lead to adverse health effects, liver or kidney problems, or nervous system effects, and may lead to an increased risk of getting cancer.
    Chlorine    NO    11/19/21Avg 1.78 Max 2.8 Range 0.8- 2.6    mg/L    N/A    4Additive to drinking water to control microbes.
    Microcystin From HAB’s (In Raw Water)        NO07/14/21 07/28/21 08/11/21 08/26/21 09/08/21 09/23/21 09/30/21 10/06/21 10/14/21 10/21/21 10/28/21 11/05/21<0.30 <0.30 <0.30 <0.30 2.7 0.69 4.5 <0.30 0.33 0.34 <0.30 <0.30        Ug/l        0        N/A      Harmful algae blooms.

Notes:

  1. Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We test it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system. Our highest single turbidity measurement for the year occurred on 7/01/21 (0.25 NTU). State regulations require that turbidity must always be below 5 NTU. The regulations require that 95% of the turbidity samples collected have measurements below 0.5 NTU.
  2. Since we had an E. coli positive sample, we triggered a Level 2 Assessment. We found E. coli bacteria, indicating the need to look for potential problems in water treatment or distribution. When this occurs, we are required to conduct assessment(s) to identify problems and corrects any problems that were found during these assessments. We were required to complete a Level 2 Assessment because we found E. coli in our system. There were no corrective actions required by the assessment.
  3. See footnote 2 above.
  4. The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 40 sites tested. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it. The 90th percentile is equal to or greater than 90% of the copper valves detected at your water system. In this case, 40 samples were collected at your water system and the 90th percentile value was the 36th value (0.0035 mg/l). The action level for copper was not exceeded at any of the sites tested.
  5. The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 40 samples collected. The action level for lead was not exceeded at any of the sites tested. The 90th percentile value for lead is 0.0012 mg/L.

Definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirement, which a water system must follow.

Non-Detects (ND):  Laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level od a contaminant in drinking water.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): A measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity is excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Milligrams per liter (mg/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid on one million parts of liquid (parts per million- ppm).

Micrograms per liter (µg/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid in one billion parts of liquid (parts per billion- ppb).

Pico curies per liter (pCi/L): A measure of the radioactivity in water.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL):  The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG):  The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is an evaluation of the water system to identify potential problems and determine, if possible, why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

WHAT DOES THIS INFORMATION MEAN?

Town of Seneca Falls Water District, as you can see by the table, our system had a Level 2 Assessment triggered by a positive E. coli and total coliform at nearby sampling locations on September 9 and 13, 2021, and thus violated the MCL for E. coli. E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Human pathogens in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms.

They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems. We found E. coli bacteria violating the MCL, and indicating

the need to look for potential problems in water or distribution. When this occurs, we are required to conduct assessment(s) to identify problems and correct any problems that were found during these assessments. We were required to complete a Level 2 Assessment because we found E. coli in our system. There were no corrective actions required by the assessment.

Town of Romulus Rt 89 Water District, the table shows that our system uncovered some problems this year. The public water supply has levels of trihalomethanes above that specified by the New York State Department of Health. The district is required to sample water for trihalomethanes within the district’s distribution system each quarter of the year,

then average quarterly sample results obtain within the past twelve months. This value is called the Running Annual Average (RAA). The New York State Department of Health has set

the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for the Running Annual Average of trihalomethanes at 80 parts per billion. On 11/10/2021 (4th quarter sample) the Rt 89 Water District’s Public Water System Running Annual Average was 83.99 parts per billion or 3.99 parts per billion above the allowable concentration. Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. We are correcting this by increasing the frequency of flushing the water mains. Research as shown that the potential for the formation of trihalomethanes is the greatest the longer chlorine remains in contact with the organic matter in the water. Flushing reduces this “contact time” which reduces Trihalomethane formation.

LEAD:

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and you children. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. The Town of Seneca Falls is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing you tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safeway /lead.

HEALTH EFFECTS OF SODIUM IN WATER:

Water containing more than 20 mg/L of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on severely restricted sodium diets. Water containing more than 270 mg/L of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on moderately restricted sodium diets.

INFORMATION ON HARMFUL ALGAE BLOOMS (BLUE GREEN ALGAE):

The Town of Seneca Falls routinely monitors lake conditions to spot harmful algae blooms by our intake lines. During the HAB (Harmful Algae Bloom) season, we frequently sample for microcystin in our raw and finished water. Levels of the toxin have been detected in the raw untreated water entering the facility, but our treatment process has been successful in removing all of the toxin to ensure your drinking water remains unaffected.

IS OUR WATER SYSTEM MEETING OTHER RULES THAT GOVERN OPERATIONS?

During 2021, our system was complaint with applicable State drinking water operating and monitoring requirements.

INFORMATION ON RADON:

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas found in soil and outdoor air that may also be found in drinking water and indoor air. Some people exposed to elevated radon levels over many years in drinking water may have an increased risk of getting cancer. The main risk is lung cancer from radon entering indoor air from soil under homes.

For additional information call you state radon program (1-800-458-1158) or call EPA’s Radon Hotline (1-800-SOS-Radon).

DO I NEED TO TAKE SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS?

Although our drinking water met or exceeded state and federal regulations, some people may be more vulnerable to disease causing microorganisms or pathogens in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly

at risk from infections. These people should seek advice from their health care provider about their drinking water. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of

infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia and other pathogens are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

WHY SAVE WATER AND HOW TO AVOID WASTING IT?

Although our system has an adequate amount of water to meet present and future demands, there are a number of reasons why it is important to conserve water:

  • Saving water saves energy and some of the costs associated with both of these necessities of life;
  • Saving water reduces the cost of energy required to pump water and the need to construct costly new, pumping systems and water towers; and
  • Saving water lessens the strain on the water system during a dry spell or drought, helping to avoid server water use restrictions so that essential firefighting need are met.

You can play a role in conserving water by becoming conscious of the amount of water your household is using, and by looking for ways to use less whenever you can. It is not hard to conserve water. Conservation tips include:

  • Automatic dishwashers use 15 gallons for every cycle, regardless of how many dishes are loaded. So, get a run for your money and load it to capacity.
  • Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.
  • Check every faucet in your home for leaks. Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day. Fix it up, and you can save almost 6,000 gallons per year.
  • Check your toilets for leaks by putting a few drops of food coloring in the tank, watch for a few minutes to see if the color shows up in the bowl. It is not uncommon to lose up to 100 gallons a day from one of these otherwise invisible toilet leaks. Fix it and you save more than 30,000 gallons a year.
  • Use your water meter to detect hidden leaks. Simply turn off all taps and water using appliances, then check the meter after 15 minutes, if it moved, you have a leak.

SANITARY CODE VIOLATIONS:

A sanitary survey was completed by the Seneca County health department in September of 2021. The system was found in compliance with sanitary code, and no violations were found.

SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS:

During 2021, the following work was completed:

Distribution System:

  • 102 New water meters were installed.
  • New main line valves were installed, which help aid in shutting down sections of the system during a water main break. Many of the valves in the system were installed in 1900 are inoperable.
  • Radio reading equipment installed/updated at multiple locations. With this equipment water meters can be read remotely without physically going on the property. This can also provide real time data if a leak occurs at the residence.
  • The town has secured for a grant to replace all water meters in our system with modern units capable of being read remotely. Over half of the water meters in our system are over 30 years old and have to be read manually by an employee. This new system can be read at any time by the office staff on their computer when necessary.
  • Multiple water main leak repairs. Our system is aging, and water main leaks do happen. They are repaired quickly by our staff whenever they occur.

Treatment Plant:

  • Moving forward with the installation of a new CO2 injection system at the treatment plant. Currently we have no means of controlling the raw pH that comes out of the lake.
  • This system will now enable us to lower the pH of the raw water to better utilize chemicals and provide a better product to our customers.
  • Along with the CO2 injections system we are working on a caustic soda feed system. This system will allow us to increase the finish water pH before it enters the

distribution system. Being able to control finish water pH will help to keep the water from corroding the pipes and helps with corrosion control.

  • A complete replacement for the PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) was completed to replace the existing unit from 2004. This is essentially the computer that controls the treatment plant. The old system was obsolete, and all repair parts were discontinued. This would have been a serious issue in the event of a failure.
  • To keep a property secure, we are currently in the process of replacing sections of fencing that need repair at the water treatment plant.

IN CLOSING:

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide your family and/or business with quality drinking water this year. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community. Look forward to seeing our staff working in the street during the 2022 construction season, as many projects are currently planned. Again, if you have any questions about our treatment processes or water sample results, please feel free to contact Chief Operator James Varricchio at 315-257-7104. We look forward to serving our community for another year!

TOWN OF SENECA FALLS WATER DEPARTMENT STAFF- 2021

Superintendent- Joseph Tullo

Chief Operator- James Varricchio

Plant Operator- Brian DeVay

Plant Operator- Mason Hawker

Plant Operator- Edward Thurston

Plant Operator- Joshua Sahler

Maintainer- Fred Peterman

Maintainer- Joseph McLane

Maintainer- Eric Matthews

Senior Account Clerk- Sarah Wright

Senior Account Clerk- Heather Robson

TOWN OF ROMULUS WATER DEPARTMENT STAFF 2021

Superintendent- Robert “Hobie” Stapleton

Town Secretary- Mary Farnsworth/ Morgan McLoud

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2021- Hamlet of Romulus

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2021

The Village of Waterloo • 41 W. Main St., Waterloo, NY 13165

(Village of Waterloo – NY4901199)

Village of Waterloo (including portions of the Towns of Waterloo, Fayette, Varick, Romulus, Tyre, Junius, Geneva and Phelps)

Town of Romulus – Hamlet of Romulus – Romulus Water District – NY4910642

The Romulus Water District strives to deliver safe drinking water to our customers and to keep the utility and system secure and protected. We are proud to deliver this annual report covering the year 2021.

Romulus Water District purchases water from the Village of Waterloo via the Seneca County Water District. The Village of Waterloo treats its water using state-of-the-art disinfection and filtration to remove or reduce harmful contaminants that may come from the source water, which includes cryptospo­ridium. Waterloo uses chlorine dioxide to disinfect and help oxidize organics and deter Zebra Mussels. Additionally, Waterloo adds activated carbon to adsorb organic contaminants in the raw water which help make the water taste better and provide an additional barrier of protection for the public water supply. The finished product is then redisinfected with chloramines before it leaves the water plant in order to maintain the distribution system’s residual integrity.  A Source Water Assessment of Waterloo’s water supply is available upon request at the Seneca County Health Department, 2465 Bonadent Drive, Waterloo 13165, (315) 539-1945.  

Important Facts About Our Water!

The Village of Waterloo relies on surface water from Seneca Lake, which is located west of the Village of Waterloo, in the heart of the Finger Lakes in upstate New York. Our intake pipe is located far from shore and very deep. We pump an annual average of 1.2 million gallons per day, with a capacity for nearly 4 million gallons per day. Plant Excess Capacity remains at over 2 million gallons per day. Our system is fairly watertight. The system can account for about 90% of all water metered from the master meter at the water treatment plant on Seneca Lake. In 2021 we produced nearly 500 million gallons, of which only about 10% remains unaccounted for. 425,000 gallons were used by the Waterloo Volunteer Fire Department.

We serve 15,000 people in and around the Village of Waterloo. Village residents pay $5.70 per 1,000 gallons, which is equivalent to about 5 cents for a 5 gal. container. Wholesale rates outside the village vary but have remained virtually flat over the last few years. A Source Water Assessment is available upon request at the Seneca County Health Department, 2465 Bonadent Dr., Waterloo, NY 13165.

The Village of Waterloo treats your water using state-of-the-art disinfection and filtration to remove or reduce harmful contaminants that may come from the source water, which includes cryptosporidium. We use chlorine dioxide to disinfect and help oxidize organics and deter Zebra Mussels. Additionally, we add powdered activated carbon to adsorb organic contaminants in the raw water which help make the water taste better and provide an additional barrier of protection for the public water supply. The finished product is then disinfected with chloramines before it leaves the water plant to maintain the distribution system’s disinfectant residual integrity. Our water system also has two emergency interconnections with the Seneca Falls water system.  These emergency interconnections have been utilized by both municipalities.

Where Can I Get More Information?

For more information about your drinking water and for opportunities to get more involved, please contact Zach Mein or Jim Bromka, NYS Grade IA & Grade D Certified Water Treatment Plant Operator and NYS & NELAP Certified Environmental Lab Director, by calling (315) 585-9811 or by writing to this address: 41 W. Main St, Waterloo, NY 13165. Also, you are welcomed and encouraged to attend regular board meetings on the second Monday of each month, 7:00 pm at 41 W. Main Street. Or, you may visit us on the World Wide Web at: www.waterloony.com. If you have questions concerning the water supply after it passes through our meter station please contact Robert Stapleton at 607-869-9326 ext. 231. Also, you are welcomed and encouraged to attend regular Town Board meetings on the third Wednesday of each month, 7:30 pm at the Romulus Town Hall. Or, you may visit us on the World Wide Web at: www.romulustown.com

Improvements and Changes in Disinfection & Operations:

Jack O’Conner, Waterloo Village Mayor, is proud of the service provided to the public by our water treatment plant. In 2000, we changed our disinfection practices, doubled our filtration capacity, added backup electric generation in case of power outages, and radio communication to better monitor overall distribution system storage status. That upgrade not only helps us to serve you better but minimizes production of harmful Total Trihalomethanes & Haloacetic Acids, by-products of chlorination disinfection. In 2021, our monitoring results showed levels of Disinfection By-Products within permitted parameters, resulting in very low levels of DBP’s:  Total Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids.

In 2007, we completed another upgrade at the water plant. We have replaced our existing BIF filters master control panel with a new, state-of-the-art Programmable Logic Controller or PLC. Also, the main computer, operating system software, and SCADA system were brought to today’s standards.   Additionally, in 2017, SCADA system hardware upgrades were completed, increasing water system reliability and security. This will benefit not only the village, but all customers to the north in Junius and Tyre, and to the south in Romulus and Varick.  We are now better able to monitor and operate tank levels & pump status for real-time daily operations which will also increase system efficiency and security. Older model radios have been replaced with more efficient and reliable RTU’s with secure high-speed internet. At Burgess Road, a fully automated booster pump station was added in 2017 supplying water demands to the north in the towns of Junius and Tyre. These expenses allow your water system to continue using cutting edge technologies as well as help to save you money overall.

The Village of Waterloo Water System uses monochloramine (small but exact amounts of chlorine and ammonia which are added) instead of chlorine (free chlorine) to provide residual disinfection in your potable water supply distribution system. Chloramines are increasingly being applied by many utilities nationwide as a more effective disinfectant in the distribution system, as they persist in remote areas of the system, produce lower levels of by-products, and have the ability to minimize chlorinous or other objectionable tastes and odors.

Chloraminated water is safe for drinking, cooking, bathing, watering plants, and all the uses we have for water every day. However, there are two groups of people who need to take special care with chloraminated water: kidney dialysis patients and fish owners. Chloramines must be removed from water used in the kidney dialysis process and from water that is used in fish tanks or ponds, because chloramines are harmful when they go directly into the bloodstream. This includes fish/turtle/reptile aquarium water, lobster tanks at grocery stores and restaurants, as well as fish containers at bait shops.

Kidney dialysis patients should check with their physician who will recommend the best pretreatment to be used. Fish tank owners should consult with their local pet store for the best dechloramination agent or filter to use. Chloramines can be reduced by using a high quality granular activated carbon filter but will not be reduced by a reverse osmosis unit or by letting water sit for a few days.

Our commitment to your water quality does not end when water leaves the treatment plant. Water samples from homes and businesses throughout the water system are tested daily. We work closely with the Seneca County Health Department to test the water using approved NYSDOH & USEPA procedures. We go a step farther. In addition to government-mandated testing for nearly 100 regulated compounds, our own laboratory technicians regularly sample your water to make sure that the treatment process at the plant is working correctly. Having our own NYS & USEPA Certified Lab helps us with allowing us the benefit of “real time” water quality test results at our fingertips.

 If you have any questions, please contact your physician, pet store, or call us at the Village of Waterloo at 315-539-9131 or Waterloo Water Plant 315-585-9811 or Seneca County Health Dept. 315-539-1919 or Romulus Water Department Superintendent Hobie Stapleton 607-869-9326 ext. 231.

The Village of Waterloo Water Department and Romulus Water District 2021 Monitoring Results for Contaminants in Drinking Water Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Microbiological Contaminants
ContaminantViolation (Yes/No)Date of SampleLevel DetectedUnitMCLG Health GoalRegulatory Limit (MCL, TT or ACL)Potential Source of Contamination
Turbidity1NO8/29/20210.338NTUNA1.00Soil runoff, algae
Distribution Turbidity1NO 8/2/20210.470NTUNA5.00 
Inorganic Contaminants       
NitrateNO8/16/210.361mg/L1010  Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sew age; Erosion of natural dep.
NitriteNO8/16/21<0.0100mg/L11Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural dep.
AntimonyNO8/16/2021<0.000408mg/L66Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder
  Sodium2  NO  8/16/21  73.8 (single sample)  mg/L  NA  250  Naturally occurring
BariumNO8/16/20210.0290mg/L22Erosion of natural deposits
ArsenicNO8/16/2021<0.00102mg/l010Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes
CopperNO6/18-24/19  0.754 (90th percentile) 0.025-0.775mg/L1.31.3=ALCorrosion of plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.
Lead3NO  6/18-24/190.0048 (90th percentile) ND-0.0087 3mg/L00.015=AL  Corrosion of plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.
Fluoride4a,4bNO8/16/2021<0.200mg/L0.8 – 2.22.2Erosion of natural deposits
NickelNO7/23/190.0009mg/LNANANaturally Occurring
Other       
Chlorine DioxideNO11/30/21590ug/LMRDLG=800MRDL=800  Water additive used to control microbes. (Primary Disinfection).
Chlorite 1/qtrNO8/10/21460ug/L10001000Byproduct of drinking water disinfection
ChloraminesNO1/6/213.86mg/LNA4.00Water additive used to control microbes. (Primary Disinfection).
Trihalomethanes 1/yearNO8/10/2118.4 site 1 20.2 site 2ug/L080Byproduct of drinking water disinfection MCL is 80
Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) 1/yrNO8/10/2110.20 site 1 8.79 site 2ug/LNA60            Byproduct of drinking water disinfection MCL is 60
TOC (Total Organic Carbon)   PNO8/16/212.99mg/LNANA    Naturally Occurs    
               
PFOA   NO6/16/211.72 ng/L  
 
  
    
Hamlet of Romulus Total Trihalomethanes Romulus Water District NY4910642 NO 8/4/2118  ug/l 80
Hamlet of Romulus Total Haloacetic Acid Romulus Water District NY4910642 NO    8/4/21 7.3 ug/l  0  60
          

Are there Contaminants in our Drinking Water?

According to State regulations, the Village of Waterloo routinely monitors your drinking water for various contaminants. Your water is tested for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, nitrate, lead and copper, volatile organic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants and trihalomethanes. Additionally, your water is tested for E. coli, coliform, and other bacteria. Only the contaminants detected in your drinking water are included in the Table of Detected Contaminants.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

In general, the sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities. Contaminants that may be present in source water include microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the USEPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The New York State Health Department and the FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below, which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Action Level (or AL): The concentration of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements, which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (or TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

90th Percentile: 90% of samples are equal to or less than the number in the chart.

NTU (or Nephelometric Turbidity Units): A measure of clarity.

NA: Not applicable.

ppt: (or parts per trillion): nanograms per liter (ng/l).

ppb: (or parts per billion): micrograms per liter (ug/l).

ppm: (or parts per million): milligrams per liter (mg/l).

pCi/L (or picocuries per liter): a measure of radioactivity.

MRDL: Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level.

MRDLG: Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal.

NOTES:

1-Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system. Our highest single turbidity measurement for the year 2021 was 0.338 NTU. State regulations require that turbidity samples collected have measurements below 1.00 NTU. All levels recorded were within the acceptable range allowed and did not constitute a treatment technique. No distribution system turbidity exceeded the NYS allowance.

2-Water containing more than 20mg/l of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on severely restricted sodium diets. Water containing more than 270mg/l of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on moderately restricted sodium diets.

3 – The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the sites tested. The action level for lead was exceeded at two of the 42 sites tested in 2019.

The state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though accurate, are more than one-year-old.

4b-Water additive that promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories. Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children may get mottled teeth.

Water Conservation Tips

Water conservation measures not only save the supply of our water source but can also cut the cost of water treatment. They can cut the energy costs at the treatment facility associated with pumping, and chemical costs for processing of the water. There are several measures you as the water consumer can do to conserve on water usage.

Conservation measures you can use inside your home include:

1. Fixing leaking faucets, pipes, toilets, etc.

2. Installation of water-saving devices in faucets, toilets and appliances. Low flow fixtures are now the only kind produced since 1994. Simply replacing old fixtures with new will reduce water consumption by nearly one-half.

3. Wash only full loads of laundry.

4. Don’t use the toilet for trash disposal.

5. Take shorter showers. Do not let the water run while shaving, washing, brushing teeth, or cleaning fruits and vegetables.

6. Soak dishes before washing. Run the dishwasher only when full.

You can conserve outdoors as well:

1. Water the lawn and garden as little as possible. If you must water, do so in the early morning or evening.

2. Use mulch around plants and shrubs or choose plants that don’t need much water.

3. Repair leaks in faucets and hoses. Use water-saving nozzles.

4. Use water from a bucket to wash your car and save the hose for rinsing.

5. Sweep clippings and leaves from walks and driveways rather than using the hose.

6. Obey any and all water bans or regulations.

Freeze Precautions:

  1. Eliminate drafts: keep basement and garage doors and windows tightly closed, close off crawl space vents and doors, and seal cracks in basement walls or crawl spaces.
  2. Insulate pipes in any unheated part of the home (exterior walls, crawl spaces, basements, cabinets) or spaces where air cannot circulate. Check for damp insulation; water-soaked insulation can cause freeze-ups.
  3. Protect water meter: Be sure the meter box cover is not broken, missing, or out of place. Report broken or missing covers to the Water & Sewer Services.
  4. Protect outside faucets. Drain outside faucets and sprinkler systems if a separate shut-off is available. Disconnect and drain garden hoses. Check with a plumber about frost-proof faucets. Caulk any space between the faucet and an outside wall.
  5. Open cabinet doors below sinks. If a sink is located against an outside wall, open cabinet doors to allow warm air to reach water pipes.
  6. Drain pipes before extended vacations.

Consumer Tips: Appearance:

*If your cold tap water appears brown or red it is probably mineral deposits in your water caused by:

  1. 1. A water main break
  2. 2. Water Dept. workers flushing a hydrant
  3. 3. Vibrations caused by construction.

To alleviate this problem, call the water department if the cause is not obvious. Once the reason has been identified and the disruption of the water main has ceased, run your cold water tap until it clears.

*If your water appears cloudy in winter and early spring it is most likely trapped air. Cold water has a much greater capacity to hold gas than warm water and if this tendency is combined with a faucet aerator, your water may appear cloudy due to bubbles. If the water is allowed to sit a short while, the bubbles will eventually rise to the surface and dissipate.

Taste & Odor:

If at any time your water tastes different than normal, please do not hesitate to call the Water Treatment Plant at 315-585-9811. We will do our best to help you find the cause of the anomaly. With the exception of the annual late summer earthy/musty season due to increased blue-green algae in Seneca Lake, there should not be any reason for your water to taste like anything but plain water.

What Does This Information Mean?

As you can see by the table, our system had no violations. We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below New York State requirements.

Summary of the SWAP (Source Water Assessment Program):

The NYS DOH has evaluated this PWS’s (Public Water System’s) susceptibility to contamination under the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP), and their findings are summarized in the paragraph(s) below. It is important to stress that these assessments were created using available information and only estimate the potential for source water contamination. Elevated susceptibility ratings do not mean that source water contamination has or will occur for this PWS. This PWS provides treatment and regular monitoring to ensure the water delivered to consumers meets all applicable standards. This assessment found an elevated susceptibility to contamination for this source of drinking water. The amount of agricultural lands in the assessment area results in elevated potential for phosphorus, DBP precursors, and pesticide contamination. While there is not a great density of permitted discharges in assessment area, the total amount of wastewater discharged from these facilities is high enough to raise the potential for contamination (particularly for protozoa). There is also noteworthy contamination susceptibility associated with other discrete contaminant sources, and these facility types include: CBS and landfills.

Is Our Water System Meeting Other Rules That Govern Operations?

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis. Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not your drinking water meets health standards. In 2021 our system was in compliance with applicable standards.

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2021- Hamlet of Willard

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for 2021

Willard Drug Treatment Center- NY4910589

7116 County Rd. 132, Willard, NY 14588

Town of Romulus – Hamlet of Willard – Willard Water District – NY4901200

INTRODUCTION

Willard Water District purchases water from the Willard Drug Treatment Center. To comply with State regulations, the Willard Drug Treatment Center and the Willard Water District, will be annually issuing a report describing quality of your drinking water. The purpose of this report is to raise your understanding of drinking water and awareness of the need to protect our drinking water sources. This report provides an overview of last year’s water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what is contains, and how it compares to State standards.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water, please contact Romulus Water Department Superintendent Hobie Stapleton 607-869-9326 ext. 231. We want you to be informed about your drinking water. If you want to learn more, please attended any of our Town Board Meetings. The meetings are held on the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the Town Meeting Room at the Romulus Town Hall located at 1435 Prospect Street, Willard, New York.

Where does our water come from?

In general, the sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include: microbial contaminants; inorganic contaminants; pesticides and herbicides; organic chemical contaminants; and radioactive contaminants.  In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the State and the EPA prescribe regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  The State Health Department’s and the FDA’s regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Our water system purchases water from the Willard Drug Treatment Campus. The total population served is approximately 1606 individuals. The water source is surface water drawn from Seneca Lake. The water is filtered by rapid sand filters and disinfected with chlorine prior to distribution. Potassium permanganate is used as a control for zebra mussels during the summer and a coagulant (Alum) is used to improve filtering of the water supply.

NYS Swap Assessment Summary

The NYS DOH has evaluated this PWS’s susceptibility to contamination under the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP), and their findings are summarized in the paragraph below. It is important to stress that these assessments were created using available information and only estimate the potential for source water contamination. Elevated susceptibility ratings do not mean that source water contamination has or will occur for this PWS. This PWS provides treatment and regular monitoring to ensure the water delivered to consumers meet all applicable standards.

    The Assessment found an elevated susceptibility to contamination for this source of drinking water. The amount of agricultural lands in the assessment area results in elevated potential for protozoa, phosphorous, DBP precursors and pesticides contamination. While there are some facilities present, permitted discharges do not likely represent an important threat to source water quality based on their density in the assessment area. However, it appears that the total amount of wastewater discharged to surface water in this assessment area is high enough to further raise the potential for contamination (particularly for protozoa). There is also noteworthy contamination susceptibility associated with other discrete contaminating sources and these facility types include: landfills and RCRA.

Are there contaminants in our drinking water?

As the State regulations require, we routinely test your drinking water for numerous contaminants. These contaminants include: total coliform, turbidity, inorganic compounds, nitrate, nitrite, lead and copper, volatile organic compounds, total trihalomethanes, and synthetic organic compounds. The table presented below depicts which compounds were detected in your drinking water.  The State allows us to test for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

It should be noted that all drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) or the Seneca County Health Department at 315-539-1945.

Table of Detected Contaminants

ContaminantViolation Yes/noDate of SampleLevel Detected (Avg./Max)  Unit MeasureMCLGRegulatory Limit (MCL,TT, or AL)Likely Source of Contamination
Turbidity         
  Distribution SystemNo2/18/21  0.70 Yearly Range 0.10-0.70NTU1N/A5.0Soil Runoff
    Filter PerformanceNo  10/28/21         0.68 Yearly Range 0.01-0.68NTUN/A0.3Soil Runoff
Inorganics         
    BariumNo11/8/2124.3ug/L20002000Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries Erosion of natural deposits
ChromiumNo11/8/21<5.0ug/L100100Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits
            NitrateNo12/2/210.47mg/LN/A10 mg/LRunoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits
SodiumNo12/2/2169mg/LN/ASee health effects2Water containing more than 20 mg/l of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on severely restricted sodium diets.
LeadNo9/3/201.63 ND – 9.3 (range)mg/LAL = 150Corrosion of household plumbing systems: Erosion of natural deposits
CopperNo9/3/200.194 0.0038 – 0.21 (range)mg/LAL=1.30Corrosion of household plumbing systems: Erosion of natural deposits
FluorideNo11/8/21<0.20mg/L2.22.2Naturally occurring
NickelNo11/8/21<5ug/LN/AN/ANaturally occurring
SeleniumNo11/8/21<3ug/L5050Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines
Total Organic Carbon (TOC)            No              1/7/21              2.8              Mg/L              N/A              TT              Naturally Occuring Total organic carbon (TOC) has no health effects. However, total organic carbon provides a medium for the formation of disinfection byproducts. These byproducts include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Drinking water containing these byproducts in excess of the MCL may lead to adverse health effects, liver or kidney problems, or nervous system effects, and may lead to an increased risk of getting cancer.
Disinfection By-products     Total Trihalomethanes4 2 SitesNo        1 sample /qtr @ 2 sites      Site 1 68.35 – RAA 40 – 111.4 (range)   Site 2 72.5 – RAA 46 – 108.7 (range)  Ug/L  080By–product of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms.  TTHMs are formed when source water contains large amounts of organic matter.
Total Haloacetic Acid                 2 SitesNo          1 sample/ qtr @ 2 sites      Site 1 13.75 – RAA 6.5 – 20 (range)   Site 2 8.075 – RAA 4.3 – 15.1 (range)Ug/L  060By-product of drinking water disinfection needed to kill harmful organisms
  Hamlet of Willard Total Trihalomethanes4 NY4901200          Yes  11/10/21  126 max.   82.75 – RAAUg/L080By–product of drinking water chlorination needed to kill harmful organisms.  TTHMs are formed when source water contains large amounts of organic matter.
  Hamlet of Willard Total Haloacetic Acid NY4901200    No  11/10/21  17 max.   16.1 – RAAUg/L060By-product of drinking water disinfection needed to kill harmful organisms
Radiological       
Gross Alpha/ BetaNo5/8/19NDpCi/L015 piC/LDecay of natural deposits and man-made emissions.
Radium 228No5/8/19NDpiC/L05Erosion of natural deposits
Radium 226No  5/8/19  NDpiC/L05Erosion of natural deposits

Notes:

1 – Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water.  We test it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.  Our highest single turbidity measurement for the year occurred on February 18, 2021 (0.70 NTU).  State regulations require that turbidity must always be below 5 NTU.  The regulations require that 95% of the turbidity samples collected have measurements below 0.3 NTU. 

2 – Water containing more than 20 mg/l of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on severely restricted sodium diets. Water containing more than 270 mg/l of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on moderately restricted sodium diets.

3 – The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 10 sites tested. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it.  The 90th percentile is equal to or greater than 90% of the lead values detected at your water system.  In this case, ten samples were collected at your water system and the 90th percentile value was the second highest value, 1.6 ug/l.  The action level for lead was not exceeded at any of the sites tested.

4 – The level presented represents the 90th percentile of the 10 sites tested.  The action level for copper was not exceeded at any of the sites tested.

Definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level  (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG):The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Action Level  (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Non-Detects (ND): Laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): A measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Milligrams per liter (mg/l): Corresponds to one part of liquid in one million parts of liquid (parts per million – ppm). 

Micrograms per liter (ug/l):Corresponds to one part of liquid in one billion parts of liquid (parts per billion – ppb).

Nanograms per liter (ng/l):Corresponds to one part of liquid to one trillion parts of liquid (parts per trillion – ppt).

Picograms per liter (pg/l): Corresponds to one part per of liquid to one quadrillion parts of liquid (parts per quadrillion – ppq). 

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L):A measure of the radioactivity in water.

Millirems per year (mrem/yr): A measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Million Fibers per Liter (MFL): A measure of the presence of asbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.

What does this information mean?

Willard Drug Treatment Center, as you can see by the table, the system had no violations. We have learned through our testing that some contaminants have been detected; however, these contaminants were detected below the level allowed by the State.

Willard Water District, the table shows that our system uncovered some problems this year. The public water supply has levels of trihalomethanes above that specified by the New York State Department of Health. The district is required to sample water for trihalomethanes within the district’s distribution system each quarter of the year, then average quarterly sample results obtain within the past twelve months. This value is called the Running Annual Average (RAA). The New York State Department of Health has set the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for the Running Annual Average of trihalomethanes at 80 parts per billion. On 11/10/2021 (4th quarter sample) the Willard Water District’s Public Water System Running Annual Average was 82.75 parts per billion or 2.75 parts per billion above the allowable concentration. Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. We are correcting this by increasing the frequency of flushing the water mains. Research as shown that the potential for the formation of trihalomethanes is the greatest the longer chlorine remains in contact with the organic matter in the water. Flushing reduces this “contact time” which reduces Trihalomethane formation.

Lead

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. Willard Drug Treatment Center is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Is our water system meeting other rules that govern operations?

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis.  Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not your drinking water meets health standards.  From December 13-16 2021, we did not report the required entry point free chlorine residuals as well as the composite filter effluent turbidity readings, and therefore cannot be sure of the quality of your drinking water during that time.

Do I Need to Take Special Precautions?

Some people may be more vulnerable to disease causing microorganisms or pathogens in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice from their health care provider about their drinking water.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia and other microbial pathogens are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

Information for Non-English Speaking Residents

Spanish

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

Why Save Water and How to Avoid Wasting It?

Although our system has an adequate amount of water to meet present and future demands, there are a number of reasons why it is important to conserve water:

  • Saving water saves energy and some of the costs associated with both of these necessities of life;
  • Saving water reduces the cost of energy required to pump water and the need to construct costly new wells, pumping systems and water towers; and
  • Saving water lessens the strain on the water system during a dry spell or drought, helping to avoid severe water use restrictions so that essential fire fighting needs are met.

You can play a role in conserving water by becoming conscious of the amount of water your household is using, and by looking for ways to use less whenever you can.  It is not hard to conserve water.  Conservation tips include:

  • Automatic dishwashers use 15 gallons for every cycle, regardless of how many dishes are loaded.  So get a run for your money and load it to capacity.
  • Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.
  • Check every faucet in your home for leaks.  Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day.  Fix it up an you can save almost 6,000 gallons per year.
  • Check your toilets for leaks by putting a few drops of food coloring in the tank, watch for a few minutes to see if the color shows up in the bowl.  It is not uncommon to lose up to 100 gallons a day from one of these otherwise invisible toilet leaks.  Fix it and you save more than 30,000 gallons a year.

Closing

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide your family with quality drinking water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.  We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community.  Please call our office if you have questions.

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR WILLARD WATER CUSTOMERS

Willard Drug treatment Center Does Not Meet Treatment Requirements

Our water system recently violated a drinking water requirement. Although this was not an emergency, as our water customers, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we did to correct this situation. We routinely monitor your water for turbidity (cloudiness). This tells us whether we are effectively filtering the water supply. Water samples for March of 2022 showed that 6 percent of turbidity measurements were over 0.3 turbidity units- the standard is that no more than 5 percent of samples may exceed 0.3 turbidity units per month. The turbidity levels are relatively low. However, their persistence is a concern. Normal turbidity levels at our plant are 0.2 units.

What should I do?

  • There is nothing you need to do. You do not need to boil your water or take other actions. We do not know of any contamination, and none of our testing has shown disease-causing organisms in the drinking water.
  • If you have a severely compromised immune system, have an infant, are pregnant, or are elderly, you may be at increased risk and should seek advice from your health care provider about drinking this water. General guidelines on ways to lessen the risk of infection by microbes are available from EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

What does this mean?

This is not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified within 24 hours. *Turbidity has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.* These symptoms are not caused only by organisms in drinking water. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice.

What is being done?

We believe that these elevated levels were a result of making new finished water pump adjustments causing air to get into the turbidity units. This air made the readings higher than they typically would have been. These readings occurred on March 25, 28, & 29, 2022.

For more information, please contact the Town of Romulus at (607) 869-9326, or the Seneca County Health Department at (315) 539-1945.

N95 Mask Giveaway

While supplies last, and on a first-come first-served basis, the Town of Romulus will be giving away N95 face masks.

The masks will be available (limit 2 per person) at the Town of Romulus Town Hall in Willard during the following hours:

Monday, January 3 through Thursday, January 6 from 10:00AM until 12:00 Noon.

If any masks remain after this week, we will post additional hours.

If you plan to enter the Town Hall, you will be expected to adhere to social distancing and mask/face covering requirements.

Tax Collector Hours

The Tax Collector will be available in the Town Office building the following hours for payment of property taxes.

January 1, 2022 to January 31, 2022

  • Monday           9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
  • Tuesday          9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Wednesday     9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Thursday         9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Friday              CLOSED

February 1, 2022 to February 28, 2022

  • Monday           9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
  • Tuesday          9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Wednesday     9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Thursday         9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Friday             CLOSED

March 1, 2022 to March 31, 2022

  • Monday           9:00 AM to 1:00 PM
  • Tuesday          9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Wednesday     9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Thursday         9:00 AM to 2:00 PM
  • Friday              CLOSED

A drop box located in the front of the Town Office building is also available anytime.

All taxes unpaid as of April 1, 2022 will have to be paid at the Seneca County Office Building, 1 DiPronio Drive, Waterloo, NY 13165.